African Interest

African Interest

  • Rat Roads One Mans Incredible Journey

    Rat Roads One Mans Incredible Journey

    Ksh 2399

    Brief summary In this extraordinary book, celebrated journalist Jacques Pauw gives a human face to some of the most tumultuous events in recent African history. Rat Roads chronicles the remarkable journey of Kennedy Gihana, a young Tutsi man who fought against the genocidaires in Rwanda, but was part of an army that committed horrifying atrocities in Africa’s bloodiest conflict.  Seeking education instead of war, he walked thousands of kilometers to South Africa, where he slept in parks, lived on the street and worked as a low-paid security guard until he had saved enough money to enroll for a law degree. In 2011 he took the podium at the University of Pretoria to receive a master’s degree in international law. Rat Roads combines many strands of life in Africa. Besides being the chronicle of one man’s incredible journey, it addresses issues such as civil conflict, xenophobia and the plight of refugees. It also explores the nature of war crimes and guilt, and gives insight into present-day Rwanda, showing how one tyranny has replaced another.  Rat Roads is a searing story of hardship and survival, and an unforgettable tale of courage and triumph.  

  • Alienation and Freedom

    Alienation and Freedom

    Ksh 3899

    Brief Summary Since the publication of The Wretched of the Earth in 1961, Fanon's work has been deeply significant for successive generations of intellectuals-for anti-colonial and civil rights activists in the 60s and 70s, for those working in postcolonial studies from the 80s to the present day, and currently for specialists of French and North African history, of colonial psychiatry, and for all those who work with conflicts of identity in postcolonial societies. Frantz Fanon is regarded as a foundational thinker of Postcolonial Studies, bringing together the analysis of colonialism from an objective, historical perspective and an interrogation of its subjective effects on colonizer and colonized alike. This book furthers his powerful intervention into how we think about identity, race and activism and provides a unique insight into Fanon's literary, psychiatric and journalistic theories. Never before published in English, Alienation and Freedom represents a rare opportunity to read the last writings of a major 20th-century philosopher who's disruptive and moving work continue to shape how we look at the world.  

  • A Certain Amount of Madness The Life Politics and Legacies of Thomas Sankara

    A Certain Amount of Madness The Life Politics and Legacies of Thomas Sankara

    Ksh 3999

    Brief Summary Thomas Sankara was one of Africa's most important anti-imperialist leaders of the late 20th Century. His declaration that fundamental socio-political change would require a 'certain amount of madness' drove the Burkinabe Revolution and resurfaced in the country's popular uprising in 2014. This book looks at Sankara's political philosophies and legacies and their relevance today.  Analyses of his synthesis of Pan-Africanism and humanist Marxist politics, as well as his approach to gender, development, ecology and decolonization offer new insights to Sankarist political philosophies. Critical evaluations of the limitations of the revolution examine his relationship with labour unions and other aspects of his leadership style.  His legacy is revealed by looking at contemporary activists, artists and politicians who draw inspiration from Sankarist thought in social movement struggles today, from South Africa to Burkina Faso. In the 30th anniversary of his assassination, this book illustrates how Sankara's political praxis continues to provide lessons and hope for decolonisation struggles today.

  • Binti Home

    Binti Home

    Ksh 1699

    Brief Summary It’s been a year since Binti and Okwu enrolled at Oomza University. A year since Binti was declared a hero for uniting two warring planets. A year since she abandoned her family in the dawn of a new day. And now she must return home to her people, with her friend Okwu by her side, to face her family and face her elders. But Okwu will be the first of his race to set foot on Earth in over a hundred years, and the first ever to come in peace. After generations of conflict can human and Meduse ever learn to truly live in harmony?   

  • The 30th Candle

    The 30th Candle

    Ksh 1899

    Brief Summary “Ok, who is this guy? You said he’s not married, so if you’re knocked up, you have to tell who he is,” Linda insisted. Thirtieth birthdays loom… Skeletons come creeping out of closets… How will this birthday end?  Linda has just cast off yet another lover, while Dikeledi can't seem to pin her fast-talking lawyer down to talk about marriage.  Nolwazi has a secret – one she can't share even with her closest friends, while Sade has found the perfect man, and a new life that will shut out the horrors of her past forever. Or will it...?  Linda, Dikeledi, Nolwazi and Sade are about to discover more with the wisdom that comes with being a year older. After all, they’re young, gifted and black in a booming new South Africa. Author of the popular thriller, Red Ink, Angela Makholwa turns her humour and skill for page-turning suspense to the escapades and sexual misadventures of modern women as they search for happiness – and hope for love.   

  • Mine Boy

    Mine Boy

    Ksh 599

    Brief Summary  Mine Boy: The First Modern Novel of Black South Africa First published in 1946, this novel exposed the condition of black South Africans under a white regime.  It presents a portrait of labor discrimination, appalling housing conditions and one man's humanitarian act of defiance.

  • Fools and Other Stories

    Fools and Other Stories

    Ksh 1899

    Brief Summary  These stories from the closing days of apartheid rule in South Africa won the Noma Award, Africa's highest literary award, and announced Njabulo Ndebele as an assured and impressive literary voice. He has gone on to become one of the most powerful voices for cultural freedom on the whole of the African continent today.  Ndebele evokes township life with humor and subtlety, rejecting the image of black South Africans as victims and focusing on the complexity and fierce energy of their lives. "Our literature," says Ndebele, "ought to seek to move away from an easy preoccupation with demonstrating the obvious existence of oppression. It exists. The task is to explore how and why people can survive under such harsh conditions." About Njabulo Ndebele: now Chancellor of Witwatersrand University in South Africa. Ndebele began publishing these stories from exile in Lesotho during the 1980s.  Ndebele is now recognized as a major voice in South Africa's cultural life. This is his only fiction collection available in Europe or North America. Ndebele's stories first began appearing in Staffrider magazine, an innovative publishing venture linked to the Soweto branch of South African PEN. Founded after the bloody Soweto riots of the mid-1970s, the magazine took as its symbol the staffriders, un-ticketed commuters from the black townships who every day clung onto or balanced on top of buses and trains to get into the cities to work. Staffrider magazine, and in particular Ndebele's stories, helped define a new tone in black South African literature that went beyond and finally overcame apartheid.  

  • Sing Unburied Sing

    Sing Unburied Sing

    Ksh 1399

    Brief Summary  An intimate portrait of a family and an epic tale of hope and struggle, Sing, Unburied, Sing examines the ugly truths at the heart of the American story and the power – and limitations – of family bonds.  Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. His mother, Leonie, is in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is black and her children’s father is white. Embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances, she wants to be a better mother, but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use.  When the children’s father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary. At Parchman, there is another boy, the ghost of a dead inmate who carries all of the ugly history of the South with him in his wandering. He too has something to teach Jojo about fathers and sons, about legacies, about violence, about love.  Rich with Ward’s distinctive, lyrical language, Sing, Unburied, Sing brings the archetypal road novel into rural twenty-first century America. It is a majestic new work from an extraordinary and singular author.  

  • The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu:

    The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu:

    Ksh 2199

    Brief Summary The Book Smugglers of Timbuktu: The Quest for This Storied City and the Race to Save its Treasures. To Westerners, the name ‘Timbuktu' long conjured a tantalizing paradise, an African El Dorado where even the slaves wore gold. Beginning in the late eighteenth century, a series of explorers gripped by the fever for discovery tried repeatedly to reach the fabled city. But one expedition after another went disastrously awry, succumbing to attack, climate, and disease. Timbuktu was rich in another way too. A medieval center of learning, it was home to tens – according to some, hundreds – of thousands of ancient manuscripts, on subjects ranging from religion to poetry, law to history, pharmacology, and astronomy.  When al-Qaeda-linked jihadists surged across Mali in 2012, threatening the existence of these precious documents, a remarkable thing happened: a team of librarians and archivists joined forces to spirit the manuscripts into hiding. Relying on extensive research and firsthand reporting, Charlie English expertly twines these two suspenseful strands into a fascinating account of one of the planet's extraordinary places, and the myths from which it has become inseparable.  

  • When The Hills Ask For Your Blood

    When The Hills Ask For Your Blood

    Ksh 1699

    Brief Summary When The Hills Ask For Your Blood: A Personal Story of Genocide and Rwanda. Into the heart of a genocide that left a million people dead 6 April 1994: In the skies above Rwanda the President's plane is shot down in flames. In the chapel of a hillside village, missionary priest Vjeko Ćurićprepares to save thousands. Near Kigali, Jean-Pierre holds his family close, fearing for their lives. The mass slaughter that follows - friends against friends, neighbours against neighbours - is one of the bloodiest chapters in history Twenty years on, BBC Newsnight producer David Belton, one of the first journalists into Rwanda, tells of the horrors he experienced at first-hand. Following the threads of Jean-Pierre and Vjeko Curic's stories, he revisits a country still marked with blood, in search of those who survived and the legacy of those who did not. This is David Belton's personal quest for the limits of bravery and forgiveness.  

  • We Do Not Have Borders

    We Do Not Have Borders

    Ksh 4399

    Brief Summary We Do Not Have Borders: Greater Somalia and the Predicaments of Belonging in Kenya. Though often associated with foreigners and refugees, many Somalis have lived in Kenya for generations, in many cases since long before the founding of the country.  Despite their long residency, foreign and state officials and Kenyan citizens often perceive the Somali population to be a dangerous and alien presence in the country, and charges of civil and human rights abuses have mounted against them in recent years. In We Do Not Have Borders, Keren Weitzberg examines the historical factors that led to this state of affairs. In the process, she challenges many of the most fundamental analytical categories, such as “tribe,” “race,” and “nation,” that have traditionally shaped African historiography.  Her interest in the ways in which Somali representations of the past and the present inform one another places her research at the intersection of the disciplines of history, political science, and anthropology. Given tragic events in Kenya and the controversy surrounding al-Shabaab, We Do Not Have Borders has enormous historical and contemporary significance, and provides unique inroads into debates over globalization, African sovereignty, the resurgence of religion, and the multiple meanings of being African.  

  • The Fate of Sudan The Origins and Consequences

    The Fate of Sudan The Origins and Consequences

    Ksh 3299

    Brief Summary The Fate of Sudan: The Origins and Consequences of a Flawed Peace Process. In 2005, the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) ended one of Africa's most devastating civil wars and set the stage for the partition of Sudan, Africa's largest country. One of the most important peace agreements in African history, it has had decisive consequences for the entire Horn of Africa.  Yet to date there has been little rigorous analysis as to why the parties signed the CPA, what strategies they adopted having signed the agreement, and the political consequences of state partition actually are. In The Fate of Sudan, John Young argues forcefully that the birth of the independent state of Southern Sudan and the threat of further dismemberment of a rump northern Sudan are due to the failure of the approaches and ideologies of the main Sudanese parties, as well as a deeply flawed US-backed peace process that excludes civil society and rebel groups. Written by an insider directly involved in the Sudanese election and referendum processes, and featuring a wealth of first-hand evidence, this is a crucial examination of a topic of intense political and media interest.  

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