Fiction & Non-Fiction

Fiction & Non-Fiction

  • The Ice Monster by David Walliams

    The Ice Monster by David Walliams

    Ksh 2199

    Brief Summary From No. 1 bestselling children’s author, David Walliams comes his biggest and most epic adventure yet! Illustrated by the artistic genius Tony Ross. This is the story of a ten-year-old orphan and a 10,000-year-old mammoth… Read all about it! Read all about it! ICE MONSTER FOUND IN ARCTIC! When Elsie, an orphan on the streets of Victorian London, hears about the mysterious Ice Monster – a woolly mammoth found at the North Pole – she’s determined to discover more… A chance encounter brings Elsie face to face with the creature, and sparks the adventure of a lifetime – from London to the heart of the Arctic! Heroes come in all different shapes and sizes in David Walliams’ biggest and most epic adventure yet!  

  • Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair by Pablo Neruda

    Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair by Pablo Neruda

    Ksh 1299

    Brief Summary When it appeared in 1924, this work launched into the international spotlight a young and unknown poet whose writings would ignite a generation. W. S. Merwin's incomparable translation faces the original Spanish text.  Now in a black-spine Classics edition with an introduction by Cristina Garcia, this book stands as an essential collection that continues to inspire lovers and poets around the world. The most popular work by Chile's Nobel Prize-winning poet, and the subject of Pablo Larraín's acclaimed feature film Neruda starring Gael García Bernal.  

  • Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty

    Truly Madly Guilty by Liane Moriarty

    Ksh 1299

    Brief Summary Six responsible adults. Three cute kids. One small dog. It’s just a normal weekend. What could possibly go wrong? Sam and Clementine have a wonderful, albeit, busy life: they have two little girls, Sam has just started a new dream job, and Clementine, a cellist, is busy preparing for the audition of a lifetime. If there’s anything they can count on, it’s each other. Clementine and Erika are each other’s oldest friends. A single look between them can convey an entire conversation. But theirs is a complicated relationship, so when Erika mentions a last minute invitation to a barbecue with her neighbors, Tiffany and Vid, Clementine and Sam don’t hesitate. Having Tiffany and Vid’s larger than life personalities there will be a welcome respite. Two months later, it won’t stop raining, and Clementine and Sam can’t stop asking themselves the question: What if we hadn’t gone? In Truly Madly Guilty, Liane Moriarty takes on the foundations of our lives: marriage, sex, parenthood, and friendship. She shows how guilt can expose the fault lines in the most seemingly strong relationships, how what we don’t say can be more powerful than what we do, and how sometimes it is the most innocent of moments that can do the greatest harm.  

  • Understanding Global Security by Peter Hough

    Understanding Global Security by Peter Hough

    Ksh 5499

    Brief Summary Fully revised to incorporate recent developments, this fourth edition of Understanding Global Security analyses the variety of ways in which people's lives are threatened and/or secured in contemporary global politics. The traditional focus of Security Studies texts: war, deterrence and terrorism, are analysed alongside non-military security issues such as famine, crime, disease, disasters, environmental degradation and human rights abuses to provide a comprehensive survey of how and why people are killed in the contemporary world. This new edition features: • Greater coverage of the evolving theoretical literature on security, including more analysis of critical theory perspectives and emerging schools of thought. • Reflections on recent developments in the conflicts in Syria and Ukraine. • New data and cases on poverty, hunger and depression and greater analysis of the social and political implications of the prolonged period of stagnation the global economy has gone through. • New content reflecting the recent resurgence in populist nationalism evident in the election of Trump in the USA, the UK’s exit from the EU and the authoritarian turn taken in many countries. • Analysis of the 2015 Paris climate change treaty and the international responses to recent pandemics such as Ebola and Zika • A new section has been included on suicide, plugging a gap evident in the earlier editions. User-friendly and easy to follow, this highly acclaimed and popular academic textbook is designed to make a complex subject accessible to all and will continue to be essential reading for everyone interested in security.  

  • Understanding International Diplomacy Theory Practice and Ethics

    Understanding International Diplomacy Theory Practice and Ethics

    Ksh 6199

    Brief Summary This book provides a comprehensive new introduction to the study of international diplomacy, covering both theory and practice. The text summarizes and discusses the major trends in the field of diplomacy, developing an innovative analytical toolbox for understanding diplomacy not as a collection of practices or a set of historical traditions, but as a form of institutionalized communication through which authorized representatives produce, manage and distribute public goods. The book: o traces the evolution of diplomacy from its beginnings in ancient Egypt, Greece and China to our current age of global diplomacy; o examines theoretical explanations about how diplomats take decisions, make relations and shape the world; o Discusses normative approaches to how diplomacy ought to adapt itself to the twenty-first century, help remake states and assist the peaceful evolution of international order. In sum, Understanding International Diplomacy provides an up-to-date, accessible and authoritative overview of how diplomacy works and ought to work in a globalizing world. This new textbook is essential reading for students of international diplomacy, and highly recommended for students of crisis negotiation, international organizations, foreign policy and international relations in general.  

  • Our Revolution A Future to Believe In by Bernie Sanders

    Our Revolution A Future to Believe In by Bernie Sanders

    Ksh 1499

    Brief Summary Throughout the Presidential campaign, Bernie Sanders galvanized voters with his progressive platform and vision for America.  In the book, Sanders shares experiences from the campaign trail and outlines his ideas for continuing a political revolution to fight for a progressive economic, environmental, racial and social justice agenda that creates jobs, raises wages, protects the environment and provides health care for all.  

  • Things I Want My Daughters to Know by Alexandra Stoddard

    Things I Want My Daughters to Know by Alexandra Stoddard

    Ksh 1699

    Brief Summary Things I Want My Daughters to Know: A Small Book About the Big Issues in Life. From a beloved lifestyle philosopher and mother, a small book of wisdom about the big questions of life, from "Be careful what you give up" to "When you've made your point, sit down". "My mother gave me milk; I have tried to give my daughters milk and honey. Milk is our basic need; honey is the fun, the happiness, the joy." Thus Alexandra Stoddard introduces her new book of simple, profound truths for joyful living. Like her strong–selling Choosing Happiness, this small book illuminates a big idea. Stoddard, a mother, grandmother, and author of more than 25 books on personal fulfilment, shares a series of succinctly–stated principles worth living by.  Each statement is fleshed out in a few brief, useful paragraphs. By turns wise ("Pain is inevitable; suffering is a choice"), controversial ("Don't feel guilty about your feelings toward your parents, stepparents, or in–laws"), affirming ("You don't have to prove anything to anyone"), and humorous ("When you discover something you love, stock up"), these short pieces cut to the essence of what's important and are oases of clarity amid life's chaos. Perfect for new graduates, new mothers, and as a treasured gift from woman to woman.  

  • Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters

    Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters

    Ksh 1799

    Brief Summary Why Beautiful People Have More Daughters: From Dating, Shopping, and Praying to Going to War and Becoming a Billionaire-- Two Evolutionary Psychologists Explain Why We Do What WeDo A lively and provocative look at how evolution shapes our behavior and our lives.  Contrary to conventional wisdom, our brains and bodies are hardwired to carry out an evolutionary mission that determines much of what we do, from life plans to everyday decisions.  With an accessible tone and a healthy disregard for political correctness, this lively and eminently readable book popularizes the latest research in a cutting- edge field of study-one that turns much of what we thought we knew about human nature upside-down.  Every time we fall in love, fight with our spouse, enjoy watching a favorite TV show, or feel scared--walking alone at night, we are in part behaving as a human animal with its own unique nature-a nature that essentially stopped evolving 10,000 years ago. Alan S. Miller and Satoshi Kanazawa re-examine some of the most popular and controversial topics of modern life-and shed a whole new light on why we do the things we do.  Reader beware: You may never look at human nature the same way again.  

  • The Good Immigrant by Nikesh Shukla

    The Good Immigrant by Nikesh Shukla

    Ksh 1399

    Brief Summary How does it feel to be constantly regarded as a potential threat, strip-searched at every airport? Or be told that, as an actress, the part you’re most fitted to play is ‘wife of a terrorist’? How does it feel to have words from your native language misused, misappropriated and used aggressively towards you? How does it feel to hear a child of colour say in a classroom that stories can only be about white people? How does it feel to go ‘home’ to India when your home is really London? What is it like to feel you always have to be an ambassador for your race? How does it feel to always tick ‘Other’? Bringing together 21 exciting black, Asian and minority ethnic voices emerging in Britain today, The Good Immigrant explores why immigrants come to the UK, why they stay and what it means to be ‘other’ in a country that doesn’t seem to want you, doesn’t truly accept you – however many generations you’ve been here – but still needs you for its diversity monitoring forms. Inspired by discussion around why society appears to deem people of colour as bad immigrants – job stealers, benefit scroungers, undeserving refugees – until, by winning Olympic races or baking good cakes, or being conscientious doctors, they cross over and become good immigrants, editor Nikesh Shukla has compiled a collection of essays that are poignant, challenging, angry, humorous, heartbreaking, polemic, weary and – most importantly – real.  

  • Do Humankinds Best Days Lie Ahead

    Do Humankinds Best Days Lie Ahead

    Ksh 1299

    Brief Summary Progress. It is one of the animating concepts of the modern era. From the Enlightenment onwards, the West has had an enduring belief that through the evolution of institutions, innovations, and ideas, the human condition is improving. This process is supposedly accelerating as new technologies, individual freedoms, and the spread of global norms empower individuals and societies around the world.  But is progress inevitable? Its critics argue that human civilization has become different, not better, over the last two and a half centuries. What is seen as a breakthrough or innovation in one period becomes a setback or limitation in another. In short, progress is an ideology not a fact; a way of thinking about the world as opposed to a description of reality. In the seventeenth semi-annual Munk Debates, which was held in Toronto on November 6, 2015, pioneering cognitive scientist Steven Pinker and best-selling author Matt Ridley squared off against noted philosopher Alain de Botton and best-selling author Malcolm Gladwell to debate whether humankind’s best days lie ahead.  

  • The Roberts Court The Struggle for the Constitution by Marcia Coyle

    The Roberts Court The Struggle for the Constitution by Marcia Coyle

    Ksh 3599

    Brief Summary The Roberts Court, seven years old, sits at the center of a constitutional maelstrom. Through four landmark decisions, Marcia Coyle, one of the most prestigious experts on the Supreme Court, reveals the fault lines in the conservative-dominated Court led by Chief Justice John Roberts Jr. Seven minutes after President Obama put his signature to a landmark national health care insurance program, a lawyer in the office of Florida GOP attorney general Bill McCollum hit a computer key, sparking a legal challenge to the new law that would eventually reach the nation’s highest court. Health care is only the most visible and recent front in a battle over the meaning and scope of the U.S. Constitution. The battleground is the United States Supreme Court, and one of the most skilled, insightful, and trenchant of its observers takes us close up to watch it in action. Marcia Coyle’s brilliant inside account of the High Court captures four landmark decisions—concerning health care, money in elections, guns at home, and race in schools. Coyle examines how those cases began—the personalities and conflicts that catapulted them onto the national scene—and how they ultimately exposed the great divides among the justices, such as the originalists versus the pragmatists on guns and the Second Amendment, and corporate speech versus human speech in the controversial Citizens United campaign case. Most dramatically, her analysis shows how dedicated conservative lawyers and groups are strategizing to find cases and crafting them to bring up the judicial road to the Supreme Court with an eye on a receptive conservative majority. The Roberts Court offers a ringside seat at the struggle to lay down the law of the land.  

  • Dissent and the Supreme Court by Melvin I Urofsky

    Dissent and the Supreme Court by Melvin I Urofsky

    Ksh 1899

    Brief Summary Dissent and the Supreme Court: Its Role in the Court's History and the Nation's Constitutional Dialogue In his major work, acclaimed historian and judicial authority Melvin Urofsky examines the great dissents throughout the Court’s long history. Constitutional dialogue is one of the ways in which we as a people reinvent and reinvigorate our democratic society.  The Supreme Court has interpreted the meaning of the Constitution, acknowledged that the Court’s majority opinions have not always been right, and initiated a critical discourse about what a particular decision should mean and fashioning subsequent decisions—largely through the power of dissent.  Urofsky shows how the practice grew slowly but steadily, beginning with the infamous & now overturned case of Dred Scott v. Sanford (1857) during which Chief Justice Roger Taney’s opinion upheld slaver and ending with the present age of incivility, in which reasoned dialogue seems less and less possible. Dissent on the court and off, Urofsky argues in this major work, has been a crucial ingredient in keeping the Constitution alive and must continue to be so.  

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